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Insufficient sex-ed

The importance of sexual education in a classroom

Products+such+as+tampons%2C+pads%2C+condoms%2C+pregnancy+tests%2C+etc.+are+easily+accessible+at+any+local+drug+store+or+super-market.+Birth+control+should+be+prescribed+by+your+physician.+
Products such as tampons, pads, condoms, pregnancy tests, etc. are easily accessible at any local drug store or super-market. Birth control should be prescribed by your physician.

Products such as tampons, pads, condoms, pregnancy tests, etc. are easily accessible at any local drug store or super-market. Birth control should be prescribed by your physician.

Haley McKain

Haley McKain

Products such as tampons, pads, condoms, pregnancy tests, etc. are easily accessible at any local drug store or super-market. Birth control should be prescribed by your physician.

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I started my first period sometime around third or fourth grade. This is really early compared to most girls, and ironically, it was the same day I had my first ever “sex-ed” class. I was horrified, disgusted, completely confused, and absolutely terrified about what was happening to my body. It seemed to me that the only thing keeping me from certain death was a very thin panty liner that would prevent my bleeding out, and I don’t recall the uncomfortable female teachers convincing me otherwise.

In seventh grade, I had my next “sex-ed” class. This is the class where they teach you about condoms and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in an attempt to scare you. This is also when I became totally convinced that I was going to get syphilis from holding hands with boys, and trust me, I was pretty scared.

Now in case you weren’t aware, you likely are not going to die from bleeding out when you get your period, and I’m pretty sure you won’t get syphilis from holding hands with anyone either.

If you ask me, I don’t think I received the sex education in school that I could and should have. Fortunately, my family was always open about things and never failed to answer my long list of questions. However, not everyone has that luxury. I believe that sex-ed is so important, and it should be taught in schools more in-depth than what is being taught now, because it’s an inevitable part of life.

Haley McKain
On a number of occasions, I’ve spoken to girls my age who didn’t know how to use a tampon. Even more shocking, I’ve spoken to boys who didn’t even know what a tampon was. A lot of women I know are super insecure and embarrassed about their period. This is a problem. So let’s clear something up: periods are not gross and should not be embarrassing. Let’s teach girls what tampons, pads, and menstrual cups are. Let’s teach them proper disposal of these products, and how to take care of themselves during their cycle. Boys aren’t off the hook here either, they will probably always be around women so they should know about these things too.

If you’re having unprotected sex, unplanned pregnancy and STDs are likely outcomes if we’re being honest. I’m well aware it’s not totally necessary for seventh graders to know how to buy condoms, pick birth control, and prevent STDs, but it wouldn’t hurt for those things to be taught in high school. Throughout my four years in high school, the most sex-ed I’ve ever had was a health teacher simply telling me to be abstinent from sex. While this solid advice works for some people, it won’t work for most.

If people were more open to talk about and educate others on topics such as periods and sex, it wouldn’t be such a taboo. Periods are not gross and dirty, they are totally normal. STD’s are pretty scary and they definitely can affect anyone, so teach people good prevention, how to get tested and get treated when necessary. Unwanted pregnancy can be prevented pretty easily too with abstinence, condoms, or birth control. Teach people where they can get these resources.

So many people feel awkward talking about periods and sex and their own bodies, but it shouldn’t be that way. If these things were taught in school regularly and in a way that’s easy for students to understand, the conversation wouldn’t be so uncomfortable.

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About the Contributor
Haley McKain, Co-Editor in Chief
Haley McKain 2018 Co-Editor in Chief A little bit about me I cry all the time. Not always in a bad way or anything, but when I’m mad, sad, and especially when I’m laughing really hard, I just cry. 😂 I’m also like, really funny. (See, that’s a joke.) But for the real, I have...
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Insufficient sex-ed