Jack’s journey:

A 14-year-old's experience with guitar and his future career plans

Beckett Allen: NP Bulldogger

NPHS+Freshman+Jack+Bunger+poses+for+a+photo+with+his+Ibanez+guitar.
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Jack’s journey:

NPHS Freshman Jack Bunger poses for a photo with his Ibanez guitar.

NPHS Freshman Jack Bunger poses for a photo with his Ibanez guitar.

Beckett Allen

NPHS Freshman Jack Bunger poses for a photo with his Ibanez guitar.

Beckett Allen

Beckett Allen

NPHS Freshman Jack Bunger poses for a photo with his Ibanez guitar.

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Practice makes perfect. That old adage definitely holds lots of truth to it. Freshman Jack Bunger has been playing nearly his entire life, and he’s getting closer to perfect, having performed out of state, and playing riffs and solos only some of the most advanced guitarists can play.

Bunger started playing at a young age, and practices every day for long periods of time without ever losing interest. “[I’ve] always wanted to play songs that I listen to,” Bunger said, “I’ve always wanted to keep on learning and keep getting better, because if you think you’re the best, there’s always someone out there that’s going to be better than you, so I never stop practicing.”

Bunger credits a large part of his success to his dad, who also has an aptitude for guitar. “He played guitar when he was a kid, and he played guitar when I was growing up, that’s what really got me into it at first,” Bunger said, “His genre of music also inspired me in that way as well.”

Bunger had the opportunity to play at the Greeley Blues Jam in Colorado this summer. “I went with a band I put together, I sang and played guitar,” Bunger said. “We played a few blues and rock tunes. That wasn’t my best gig I think I played, but it was the best as far as people and turnout.”

Recently, Bunger has started to teach guitar lessons at Kittle’s Music Store, having students of all ages. “It’s pretty fun to have a job where you can play guitar for a living,” Bunger said. “My oldest is 41, and my youngest is 8. Some of them learn faster, some of them learn slower, and each and every one of them has different potential.”

Going into the future, Bunger definitely plans to continue his music career. “I would love to be able to record my own music,” Bunger said. “Hopefully I can go to school for audio engineering so I can actually make my own music.” The one goal that Bunger has is to be able to stay in the music industry as he gets older. “I do not like working normal jobs,” Bunger said. “I know I could if I have to, but I love the way I can play guitar now and get paid a decent amount of money. I’m only 14, so I can’t imagine what will be waiting for me,” Bunger said.

 

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