MIP FYI

A closer look into NPHS students' use of drugs and alcohol

Pictured+above+is+School+Resource+Officer+Johnson%27s+police+car+in+front+of+NPHS.
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MIP FYI

Pictured above is School Resource Officer Johnson's police car in front of NPHS.

Pictured above is School Resource Officer Johnson's police car in front of NPHS.

Sierra Winder

Pictured above is School Resource Officer Johnson's police car in front of NPHS.

Sierra Winder

Sierra Winder

Pictured above is School Resource Officer Johnson's police car in front of NPHS.

Sierra Winder, Staff Writer

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37 and 48. That is how many  minor in possession (MIP) arrests have been recorded in North Platte High School students in 2016 versus 2019. There are multiple theories about why these numbers are getting worse. Freshman Blaise Zeiler thinks that kids are simply getting into more trouble these days. “Generations are just getting worse,” she said. On the other hand, a difference of 11 could just be the difference of one party getting busted. “I think those numbers are just a good average,” school resource officer Jerimiah Johnson said. 

There is also a noticeable increase in marijuana use compared to alcohol and illegal substances among minors. According to Johnson, it is not primarily limited to high school students either. “In general, marijuana use is more prevalent in 6th grade and going into 5th grade,” officer Johnson said. 

According to americanaddictioncenters.org, Omaha, Neb. is rated number one in the nation for marijuana use, number one in methamphetamine use, and number three in cocaine use. However, Nebraska’s drug induced deaths were lower than the national average.

Some students notice an increase in students partying. “More kids are definitely giving up sports for drugs…I think it is also because of drug testing,” freshman Alex Schimek said. 

Some students believe that even though teens have easy access to most illegal substances,, people can still find ways to avoid them all together. “ I know people are still doing it but the ones that really care about their future are the ones that are minimizing the use of it,” junior Ellie Hanson said.

Junior Brooklyn Douglas agrees.“They look at it from a different perspective, they don’t really think about the consequences,” she said.

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